Misdemeanor

Possible Charges

Misdemeanors in Florida are any crime punishable by up to one year in county jail and can be either be a first or second degree.

First degree misdemeanors are punishable by up to one year in county jail and a $1000 dollar fine while second degree misdemeanors are punishable by up to sixty (60) days in county jail and a $500 dollar fine.

    Some examples of first degree misdemeanors are:

  • Refusal to take a breath test after DUI refusal (second offense)
  • Simple battery
  • Possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana
  • Possession of drug paraphernalia
  • Reckless driving
  • Disorderly conduct
  • Driving on a suspended or revoked drivers license (second offense)
  • Trespassing
    The following are considered second degree misdemeanors:

  • No valid drivers license
  • Driving on a suspended or revoked drivers license ( first offense)
  • Expired tag greater than six months
  • Criminal mischief less than $200

Consequences

The consequences of a misdemeanor conviction could subject a person to consequences other than a conviction, a jail sentence, court fines and probation.

Being convicted of a misdemeanor marijuana possession could result in the suspension of your driving privileges.
Three convictions of petty theft or driving on a suspended or revoked drivers license could lead to a person being charged with a felony.
Also, being arrested for a misdemeanor could subject university students to disciplinary proceedings.
With the frequent use of background checks employers can compare your misdemeanor conviction with the background of others who might be seeking the same position.
Additionally, Most employment applications will ask whether a person has a misdemeanor conviction.

Lee Meadows has handled hundreds of misdemeanor.
He realizes that keeping a conviction off your record is extremely important.
As not all cases go to trial it is important to select an attorney who knows there are alternatives to a conviction, such as:
-Diversion
-Having adjudication withheld
-Having the charges reduced
After a case is concluded it may also be possible to petition the court to seal or expunge your arrest records.